FAQs

FAQ Categories

Accounting

Customer Service

After Sales

Electrical

Applications

General FAQs

Pumps

Sales

Questions & Answers

Accounting

What are the standard terms given to your customers?

Standard terms given to all customers are net 30 days, depending on credit.

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What forms of payment do you accept?

We accept cash, check, money order, ACH transfers, wire transfers, and cashier's check. We also accept American Express, MasterCard and VISA.

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What are your credit terms?

Our standard terms are NET 30, after your company's credit has been approved. We also accept Visa and MasterCard and will ship C.O.D. Special payment terms are required for orders over $25,000. Please contact us at 1-888-925-5444 for more information.

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Customer Service

What is your billing address?

935 S. Woodland Avenue
Michigan City, IN 46360

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What are your office hours?

Office Hours are 7:30 AM to 4:30 PM CST

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Who can I speak with to get an estimate on freight charges?

Please contact Customer Service at 219-861-0661

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When is our order shipping?

You will find this information on the copy of the Sales Order that has been e-mailed, and/or faxed, to you as confirmation of your purchase order.

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Can the shipping date of our pump or system be moved up?

We can, on occasion, move up a shipping date, depending on availability of pumps, parts, and production schedule. We will do everything in our power to accommodate your request. For details, please contact customerservice@dekkervacuum.com or call 1-888-925-5444.

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Has our order shipped and what is the pro # ?

Every time we ship an order, we e-mail, and/or fax, all the relevant information to the customer immediately after the freight company has picked up the order. Your pro # and truck line name will be stated on the e-mail, and/or fax, so you can contact the freight carrier direct.

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Which truck line would get our shipment here the fastest?

We need the ship-to zip code to be able to research this and would get back to you as soon as possible with the information. Please contact customerservice@dekkervacuum.com or call 1-888-925-5444 for more information.

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How much will the freight for our shipment be?

Once we have all the details, such as ship-to address, shipping method and weight of merchandise, we can provide you with this information. Please contact customerservice@dekkervacuum.com or call 1-888-925-5444 for more information.

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After Sales

Why is my Vmax system shutting down on Hi Temperature?

Check the y-strainer screen on the oil supply line for contamination. Clean the radiator fins of any dust or contamination. Ensure the system is running at a minimum of 15" HgV vacuum.

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What would cause my pump, which has been on a shelf or in storage, to lock up?

Some pump models have Cast Iron materials of construction. Without proper storage procedures, condensation will cause oxidation to occur on the internal components of the pump. This results in rust interference against the impeller due to tight clearances. Clearances between the impeller and port plates can be 0.007” or roughly the thickness of 2 sheets of notebook paper. Spraying the locked up components with a rust penetrator such as ‘PB Blast’ can help free up seized components. 

If the pump has been run with hard water, and has been in long term storage without proper storage fluid, Scale may have also seized up the pump. De-Scaling fluid is available from DEKKER. Water-sealed pumps that will not be in operation for more than 30 days should always be completely flushed, and stored with a rust-inhibiting anti-freeze. This includes pumps on DVW water-sealed systems.

Pumps on VMX oil-sealed systems do not require special storage fluid if the pump is primed with Standard or Synthetic Vmax Oil.

If the pump or system will be stored Long-Term, rotate impeller every 2-3 months by 2 and ¼ turns. This will allow storage fluid or oil to pass through the blades and cavities of the impeller, and ensure that the shaft and bearings rest on a new spot.

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Why is my pump not pulling vacuum?

Check all vacuum lines going from your process to the vacuum pump. Are there any leaks allowing air to bleed in? Listen for hissing noise and correct any leaks. If the system is an Aqua-Sealed pump to which you supply the seal fluid, make sure that the pump is receiving adequate flow of seal fluid. Use a compound gauge in the seal fluid line to determine whether positive pressure or negative pressure exists. If unable to determine a source of the issue, contact Dekker for additional assistance. Dekker technician will ask how the pump is connected to the process and seal fluid, and may require photos or a piping diagram. Please have this information available when calling as it will ensure the best chances of resolving your issue.

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Why is there is no oil in my new Vmax site glass?

The system is shipped with a full charge of oil, however the sump tank has an open top and some oil may have washed to the outer blow by shell. Run the system for 2 hours at deep vacuum to pull the oil from this outer shell back to the sump tank.

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Why is my Vmax is blowing oil all over the roof?

Running the system at low vacuum levels will cause the oil to blow through the separator exhaust filter element. Run at deep vacuum levels (minimum 15” HgV), check for leaks in piping, do not allow the system to pull atmosphere.

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Why is oil leaking all over the floor from the end of the Vmax pump?

This is most likely a mechanical seal leak, call factory for service.

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Aux Contactor Pull-In Fault

The Auxiliary Contactor relies on a 24VDC signal to activate. This in turn pushes in the Main M1 Contactor and allows Main Voltage to pass through to the motor. Please check to see if this little block has vibrated loose, filled with debris, or if any wires are loose. If you have a remote start/stop switch enabled, remove the switch, re-insert the jumper from 1-27 and disable the Remote Start Option. If the system runs fine without the Remote Start/Stop, the fault is in not in the DEKKER Controller.

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I need to retrofit an early 2000’s pump onto a Vmax skid with a current pump.

If the pump to be replaced has a MFG Date prior to 2003, and is installed on a Vmax skid, there will be work involved in retrofitting the current pump to that skid. The overall dimensions of current pumps/motors has changed significantly so that overall length is generally longer. This means that the heat exchanger will typically need to be moved further away from the pump, and in certain cases foot-mounting will not matchup.

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The VFD in my control panel is showing faults or has failed.

If the system is still within the Warranty timeframe, log the fault and contact Dekker factory immediately. Please have the model number, serial number, and fault codes available. Dekker will contact VFD manufacturer and initiate a claim, the manufacturer will either advise on troubleshooting or replacement options. If the system is outside of the Warranty timeframe, Dekker representative will advise on replacement options. Dekker cannot repair failed drives. Some drives are obsolete and old control panels are not compatible with current VFD’s, some older panels may need to be replaced completely.

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My shipment was delivered with noticeable Freight Damage.

It is the responsibility of the recipient of the Freight to inspect the entire skid prior to signing for the shipment. If the skid has any noticeable damage, shrink wrap is missing, wooden skid is broken, etc. the DAMAGE MUST BE NOTED ON BOTH COPIES OF THE BOL, INCLUDING THE DRIVER’S BILL OF LADING! Undiscovered damage usually has a 1 week grace period. If the system has a control panel, Dekker strongly suggests that the customer inspects the internals, and apply power to ensure that the panel was not damaged in transit as well. Dekker will not absorb freight claims that are not honored by the Freight Carrier.

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How do I get replacement parts for a Freight Claim?

The following is only applicable if Freight Damage was noted properly on both copies of BOL, and the Freight Carrier has been notified:  If the recipient pre-paid for freight (Third-Party Bill or Collect), they must purchase replacement parts from Dekker and file them on a Freight Claim. If Dekker paid for shipping (Pre-Paid), they will provide the replacement parts and file against the Freight Company.

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My pump has failed.

If the pump has failed within the Warranty timeframe, contact Dekker After Sales immediately. Have the model and serial number available. Please be prepared to discuss whether the motor has failed, or the pump has locked up. Dekker will troubleshoot to attempt to resolve the issue; if Dekker representative cannot resolve the issue over the phone or via email, they will issue an RMA to return the pump.

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How do I get a replacement pump?

Customer must submit a Purchase Order for an exact replacement pump. When this new pump arrives, customer will send their pump back for Warranty consideration. Replacement pump availability is dependent on current inventory and production capabilities. Please refer to  Warranty Policy at the end of your IO&M (Installation, Operation and Maintenance Manual) and DEKKER Warranty Process.

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I will not be using my pump immediately upon receipt, is there anything I should do to prepare them for temporary storage?

Many Dekker pumps are built with Cast Iron parts, these parts are susceptible to surface rust. Clearances between the impeller and other surfaces can be as close as 0.007” or roughly the thickness of 2 sheets of notebook paper. If the end user expects the pump to be in storage or not in use for any more than 4-5 weeks, Dekker strongly suggests that pumps are stored  with rust-inhibiting anti-freeze. Pumps on VMX systems already have a full charge of oil, and do not require special storage fluid. Vmax Standard and Synthetic oil will inhibit oxidization.

Rotate the impeller by 2 and ¼ turns every 2-3 months to circulate the storage fluid. This will allow storage fluid or oil to pass through the blades and cavities of the impeller, and ensure that the shaft and bearings rest on a new spot. Locked up pumps as a result of improper storage are not warrantable.

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What is the difference between a leak and a weep?

Seals work by having two flat seal faces pushed together by axial force from the closing mechanism and by product pressure in the seal chamber. When the seal is in operation, the two faces are lubricated by the seal fluid (in our case, oil).

This thin film of lubrication protects the faces of the seal from heat and excessive wear but can allow a minute amount of leakage across the seal face. This minute leakage is called a weep. While a weep has rather arbitrary limits, it is commonly considered to be a leakage rate of less than one drop of liquid per minute.  Anything greater than 1 drop per minute is considered to be a leak.

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Do you have a distributor in the area for service?

Dekker Vacuum Technologies has an extensive network of Distributors and Service Centers. Please contact aftersales@dekkervacuum.com or call us at 1-888-925-5444 for more information.

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Where can I find the Installation and Operation Manual?

Every pump and system has an IOM attached, as well as the Warranty Card and a Start-up Record, inside a plastic sleeve when it leaves the factory. If it is missing, please check with your Receiving Department, as they may have removed some of the paperwork. The Operating Manuals for our Vmax, AquaSeal, ChemSeal, and DuraVane systems can also be found in our Resource Library on our website in the Literature section. If necessary, we can send you another hardcopy. Please contact aftersales@dekkervacuum.com or call us at 1-888-925-5444 for more information.

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My Vmax is low on seal fluid. Is it ok to run?

Typically, yes. If you just noticed that the sight-glass is low, and it has not been more than 10k hours since the last oil change, you can continue to run the system until the DEKKER oil arrives. Standard oil is typically in stock and transit time depends on the method of delivery chosen.

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There is a lot of white smoke blowing out of the exhaust of my Vmax.

No alarm, the oil is not combustible, and does not ignite at standard operating temperatures. Vmax models are programmed to shut down at 225°F which will prevent any major burning issues. What is happening is that oil is carrying over, and blowing out of the exhaust stack. This means that the system is running below the recommend operating pressure of 15"Hg. Address all possible sources of air leak, and make sure the system runs at a level above 15"Hg.

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I don’t see any oil circulating through my scavenger lines on my Vmax.

You won’t always see oil. Take bottom brass fitting off, clean out the fitting and check for any clogs. Use a pipe cleaner and have a 5 gallon bucket on hand to catch any oil. Remove the lid of the separator tank and check the metal tube that rests at the bottom of the separator filter. This chamfered end should be free of clogs. Also clean with a pipe cleaner.

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Black oil is circulating through my scavenger lines at the bearings housings on my Vmax.

This indicates mechanical seal failure. The carbon faces of the mechanical seal have failed and black carbon powder is mixing with the oil and being pulled into the vacuum pump. You do not need to purge the old oil, but stop the system immediately and change the mechanical seal.

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My Vmax is overheating.

Only DEKKER brand oil should be used in the Vmax. DEKKER cannot troubleshoot or offer solutions if alternative oils are being used in the Vmax.

There are a few things that can cause this to happen. Most likely, the vacuum pump is not pulling a deep enough vacuum to efficiently circulate its oil. When the vacuum level drops below 15"Hg, the system cannot circulate the oil as efficiently as it does at deeper vacuum levels. Fix any leaks and run the system at a deeper vacuum level when possible. Also, the ball valve before the Y-Strainer should always be 100% open while the unit is in operation or standby; only close this valve when servicing the unit.

Another cause would be a clogged heat exchanger. Hot air blowing through the cooler should feel even across the face, and get slightly cooler near the bottom. If you feel a major cool spot, that could be the source of a clog. The horizontal tubes are only about 1/8” in diameter, and over time, debris can clog these tubes. This will result in restricted oil flow, and the cooler will no longer be able to transfer heat efficiently. Since these coolers are welded, it is not possible to clean the tubes without cutting the unit apart; this would void warranty. However, it is possible to flush the radiator, but in some cases the clogging is so severe that the tubes cannot be un-blocked.

Finally, the solenoid valve can be a cause of overheating. Oil flow through the solenoid relies on a gasket that opens when the vacuum system is ON and closes when the vacuum system is OFF. If the gasket gets ripped, or if the solenoid fails mechanically, it could inhibit the flow of oil. The solenoid can also restrict oil flow if it has a poor electrical connection. This is typically indicated by chattering at the solenoid and a major difference in temperature across the solenoid.

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My system was built for 460 Volts, but I need it to run on 230V (or 230V to 460V).

The terminals of the motor must be re-wired per High or Low voltage (Wye/Delta). Junction box should typically have a diagram for 6 or 9 pin terminal configuration.

If going from higher voltage to lower voltage, you will be increasing amperage. The Overload, Fuses, and Cable for Mains Power will need to be replaced to accommodate higher amperage.


If going from lower voltage to higher voltage, amperage will decrease. You may need to consider replacing the Overload and Fuses if their amperage range is over the Service Factor Amps of the motor. You do not want a protective device to allow the motor to run above the Service Factor Amps. Contact DEKKER for assistance and pricing and availability on parts.

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My pump is leaking.

Please note the severity of the leak and wipe down the system to determine the source of the leak. DEKKER technicians will be unable to assist without clear information in regards to the source of the leak. DEKKER technician must have confirmation if it is a housing leak, piping leak, or hose leak.

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I would like a DEKKER Service Technician on-site Startup Assistance.

Contact DEKKER After Sales Team to schedule your start-up. Please schedule two weeks in advance of start-up. A purchase order must be received per After Sales Estimate. Technician will observe and document start up and train operators. Technician will not be responsible for connecting the system to the process, electrical installation, or troubleshooting customer’s process. The system must be installed and ready to run upon technician’s arrival.

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I would like a DEKKER Service Technician on-site for Service/Maintenance.

DEKKER Service technicians can perform field service. Allow two weeks in advance notice. A purchase order must be received per After Sales Estimate. You will only be billed for actual hours worked and parts used.

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I need a DEKKER Service Technician on-site immediately.

At this time, DEKKER Service Technicians are not readily available for immediate dispatch. Emergency and warranty situations will be considered, but due to the demands of scheduled service work and startup assistance DEKKER cannot currently provide an immediate response fleet. Please contact your local distributor for urgent service needs.

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What are the affects of pumps being run in sub freezing temperatures? Should the oil be heated/warmed to a certain minimum temperature for proper operation?

Minimum oil temperature should not be below 45°F.  Running below this temperature does not allow the oil to properly circulate through the machine.

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How does one reset the service hours on a Vmax system with a Dekker Controller?

>Hold Escape button until you see “password” at the bottom of the screen.

>Hit the maintenance button twice to enter service password. “033”.

>Hit the enter button

>Press Maintenance button until you see the Maintenance Schedule

>Use UP/DOWN Arrows to highlight Hrs To Srv

>Press Enter

>Press up arrow once to reset to change hours to next maintenance schedule 500 hours (The count goes by 500, so that you only have to press the up key once to reset the 500 hr maintenance period, instead of holding it.)

>Press Enter to save.

>Hit escape button to reset.

 

Example:

If current hours is 0 and you are getting a 500 Hr service warning:

Reset this value back to 500

Service Hours count down

On the 500 Hour Service it starts at 500

Counts down to 0

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Electrical

What is a Variable Frequency Drive?

Variable Frequency Drives (VFD) are electronic controllers that adjust the speed of an electric motor by modulating the frequency of the power that is delivered to the motor, matching the speed of the motor to the actual requirements of the process.

Most vacuum systems that are driven with an electric motor operate at full speed even when the vacuum system does not require its full capacity to meet vacuum demand. Mechanical devices such as vacuum switches to stop and start the system or vacuum relief valves to bleed air into the system are often used to regulate the amount of vacuum. This process creates extra wear on the vacuum system by producing excessive stop-starts or uses unnecessary energy by running full speed and bleeding in relief air. By using a VFD to control the speed of the vacuum system motor to match vacuum demand can save up to 50% of the energy cost required to operate the system.

To better understand how a VFD operates, it is important to first understand how a fixed-speed electric motor functions.

Alternating current (AC) motors run at speeds determined by the number of poles in the motor and the frequency of the AC supply called the synchronous speed. The synchronous speed is measured in RPM where RPM = (120 x F) / P where:

RPM = revolutions per minute
F = frequency in hertz
P = number of poles (an even number as poles are always paired)

For example:
A 4-pole motor that is running at 60 hertz will have a synchronous speed of 1800 RPM
(120 x 60) / 4
That same motor running at 50 hertz will have a synchronous speed of 1500 RPM
(120 x 50) / 4

Most standard AC motors are designed to operate at a fixed, rated frequency and speed. At this fixed speed, the built-in cooling system will keep the motor from overheating. When operated as an adjustable speed device at slower speeds, the motor cooling action will be reduced. On such applications, the motor may need to be a motor specifically designed for AC drive operation. Motors used on a VFD system are usually three-phase induction motors.

All AC drives convert AC to DC then use various switching techniques to invert the DC into a variable-voltage, variable-frequency AC output. When the VFD starts the motor, it initially applies a low frequency and voltage to the motor to avoid high inrush current that would occur if the motor was started by simply applying voltage with a switch. The frequency and voltage are increased at a controlled rate to ramp up the motor without drawing excessive current.

The VFD also controls the frequency and voltage as the motor stops, allowing the motor to ramp down at a controlled rate. When the frequency approaches zero, the motor is shut off.

The VFD’s built-in microprocessor regulates the speed of the motor by reacting to input from the process (in our case from input voltage provided by a vacuum transducer) and applying that input to the set points that have been programmed into the VFD.

Download the PDF here

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Variable Frequency Drives - Features and Benefits

DEKKER VmaxVFD vacuum systems offer the most reliable and energy efficient systems today. DEKKER’s advanced design combines the proven benefits of our Vmax oil-sealed liquid ring vacuum pumps with variable frequency drive (VFD) motor speed control. The vacuum systems are microprocessor controlled and offer substantial energy savings by automatically adjusting pump speed to match varying vacuum demand. This eliminates frequent stop-starts and results in more stable vacuum levels.

Design Features
VFD motor control lowers energy costs by adjusting speed to match varying vacuum demand.VFD “soft start” ramps motor speed gradually to extend system life, lower maintenance needs and reduce initial inrush current.

This new approach to energy-efficient vacuum systems allows simple, cost-effective expansion for customers who anticipate future building plans or increased demand.

Proprietary intelligent logic control monitors pumps and adjusts sequencing of multiplex systems as availability or demand changes.

DEKKER liquid ring vacuum pumps have only one moving part which results in cooler and quieter operation, high reliability, increased uptime, and lower maintenance costs.

Reliable for tough applications such as woodworking and soil remediation, the VmaxVFD is built to tolerate accidental carryover of liquids and soft solids.

Benefits
Control of power consumption - p to a 50% turndown in power, equates to energy savings.
Example: In a facility operating a 40 HP vacuum pump system with a VFD, let us assume the system would be running at a maximum load for only 50% of the time. The VFD would be in operation the rest of the time at a maximum turndown, resulting in reduced power consumption of 50%. A 40 HP vacuum system with VFD yields the following results:

EXAMPLE: Two shifts at 8 hrs each is 16 hrs/day. With a 6 day work week we have 96 hrs/wk or 4,992 hrs/year
BEFORE A VFD WITH A VFD
Using a normal across the line starting: Power cost = (HP/motor efficiency) x 0.746 x ($/kWh) x (hrs/yr) 50% of the time the pump will be operating on maximum load or 40 HP. Power cost is 50% of annual cost before VFD or $8,008.
Assuming  a  motor  efficiency  of  93%  and  a utility rate of $0.10 per kilowatt hour* The other 50% of the time, using VFD, the pump would operate at 20 HP. Power cost = (20/0.93) x 0.746 x ($0.10) x 2,496 = $4,004
Power cost = (40/0.93) x 0.746 x ($0.10) x 4,992 = $16,017 annual cost Total annual power cost using a VFD is $8,008 $4,004 = $12,012 annual cost
THE VFD SAVINGS: Power cost savings realized is $16,017 - $12,012 = $4,005 yearly.
* Utility rate subject to change without notice.

 

Control of current inrush — Soft starting reduces wear on system components and eliminates current inrush during startup. When using conventional across-the-line starting, inrush current during startup will be 6 - 7 times motor running amps. Power companies analyze these spikes and their frequency and charge customers for these spikes. By using a VFD these spikes are eliminated by softly starting equipment.

Control of vacuum — Maintains vacuum level as leakage in the process increases.

Controls material damage and waste — Reduced slippage in hold-down applications results in less material damage and material waste.

Download the Variable Frequency Drives - Features and Benefits PDF

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Dekker Controller Overview

For use with DEKKER Vacuum Systems Equipped with DEKKER Controller

Each Vmax system is tested and checked at the factory prior to shipment to ensure trouble-free operation. In the unlikely event you encounter a problem, we recommend that you consult with your local distributor for parts/service. Remember, when calling for service, parts or system information, always have the pump or system model number and serial number ready.

Click here to find your local authorized distributor

The DEKKER Controller is standard on the Vmax models. The DEKKER Controller provides for system control as well as monitoring of system status. Service functions include display of spare parts list, maintenance schedules, service history, and logging of fault conditions.

The DEKKER Controller includes:

  • 4-line large-font liquid crystal display
  • Durable Lexan membrane keypad
  • Multiple-status LEDs

Communication between controllers is via RS485 for multimachine systems. An Ethernet port provides for remote monitoring and control via TCP/IP protocols and can be enhanced with the use of DEKKER’s OnDek software (optional and purchased separately). Power input to the controller is 24VDC

  • 9 - Digital (24VDC) inputs
  • 7 - Dry relay contact outputs (24VDC)

Analog I/O includes:

  • 2 - RTD inputs
  • 4 - 010VDC \ 4 - 20mA inputs
  • 1 - 010VDC output
  • 1 - 420mA output

When power s applied to the DEKKER Controller, the Initializing screen (INITIALIZING) is displayed along with the Firmware version. When calling in for support on the DEKKER Controller, please have the Firmware version available.

Initializing After the DEKKER Controller Initializing screen displays, it will begin searching for the DHCP server. The DHCP server is what is used to communicate with the DEKKER Controller when using the optional OnDeck software. While searching for the server, the screen will change from Initializing (INITIALIZING) to Searching For DHCP Server.
Searching After the DEKKER Controller either finds the DHCP server or has the search time out, the screen will change to the Static IP Address screen. Shown on this screen is the Static IP Address (STATIC IP ADDRESS) which is used to communicate with the DEKKER Controller when using the optional OnDek software. During this initialization, the controller will also search for other DEKKER Controllers that are connected via the RS 485 cable and display the number of units found.
No_DHCP During the initialization period, if the Power button is pressed, the Power LED will not be illuminated. After the initialization sequence is complete, pressing the Power button will display the Main Status Screen.
LD_Stopped Note the LEDs along the bottom of the DEKKER Controller. Starting from the left, the Hand/Auto LED has the green light on indicating the controller is in Auto mode. The Power LED is illuminated with the red light indicating the power is On. The On LED is not illuminated because the pump is not running. The Off LED has the red light illuminated indicating the pump is Off. The Run Status LED has the red light on indicating the pump is Off.
LD_Running Note the difference on the Main Status screen while the pump is on. Starting from the left, the Hand/Auto LED has the green light on indicating the controller is in Auto mode. The Power LED is illuminated with the red light indicating the power is On. The On LED is now illuminated with the green light because the pump is running. The OFF LED now as the red light turned off indicating the pump is On. The Run Status LED has the green light on indicating the pump is running. The Run Status LED will turn orange if the Vacuum Switch option (which allows the pump to turn on and off based on vacuum level) has been purchased and the pump is in the Standby mode.

 

Download Dekker Controller Overview PDF

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Dekker Controller Keypad

For use with DEKKER Vacuum Systems Equipped with the DEKKER Controller

Each Vmax system is tested and checked at the factory prior to shipment to ensure trouble-free operation. In the unlikely event you encounter a problem, we recommend that you consult with your local distributor for parts/service. Remember, when calling for service, parts or system information, always have the pump or system model number and serial number ready.

Click here to find your local authorized distributor

The DEKKER Controller text display, buttons and LEDs are described below.

The Lexan overlay on the controller is durable and scratch resistant. Buttons should be actuated with fingers, avoiding the use of tools or sharp objects as they may damage the overlay. The overlay may be cleaned by gentle wiping with a damp cloth. Avoid solvents or vigorous rubbing. Isopropyl alcohol wipes may be used on difficult areas.

ControllerKeypad

  • 4-line liquid crystal display
  • Up arrow / button is used to navigate menus and change values for setpoints, real-time clock, vacuum units, and temperature units
  • Down arrow / - button is used to navigate menus and change values for setpoints, real-time clock, vacuum units, and temperature units
  • Enter button is used to select menu items and values
  • Hand / Auto LED is used to identify the run status of the system. Orange = Hand (manual operation). Green = A
  • Hand / Auto button is used to alternate between Hand (manual operation) and Auto mode
  • Power button is used to turn the controller on and off
  • Power On LED is used to indicate if the controller power is on. Red = Controller power is on
  • On LED is used to display if the system is running or in standby mode. Green = System is either running or in Standby mode
  • On button is used to start the system
  • Off button is used to stop the system
  • Off LED is used to display if the system is stopped. Red = System is stopped
  • Run Status LED is used to display the current run status. Green = System is running. Orange = System is in Standby or Auto mode. Red = System is stopped
  • Reset button is used to reset faults. Note: Fault condition must be cleared before the Reset button will reset the fault.
  • Log button is used to access the Fault History Log menu
  • Maintenance button is used to access menu for the Spare Parts List, Maintenance Schedule and Service History
  • Program button (PROG) is used to access the Programming menu for Setpoints, Clock, Vacuum Units, Temperature Units and other keycode options that are purchased after the original sale (such as hi or low-level switches, backpressure, etc.)
  • Escape button (ESC) is used to return to the Run/Standby/Stopped screen

Download the DEKKER Controller Keypad PDF

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Dekker Controller Security Access Levels

For Use with DEKKER Vacuum Systems Equipped with the DEKKER Controller

Each Vmax system is tested and checked at the factory prior to shipment to ensure trouble-free operation. In the unlikely event you encounter a problem, we recommend that you consult with your local distributor for parts/service. Remember, when calling for service, parts or system information, always have the pump or system model number and serial number ready.

Click here to find your local authorized distributor

The DEKKER Controller is protected against unauthorized access to system parameter changes. Security codes can be entered as follows to access functionality of the DEKKER Controller.

ControllerSecurityAccess

The default for the controller is Basic Access. With Basic Access, the user is able to clear faults, but is unable to make any parameter changes.

The security access level is changed by entering a password. To enter a password, press and hold the Escape button (ESC) for two seconds. The screen will display Password. To enter the password, use the keys to represent the numerical value as follows (also reference the diagram above):

1 = Escape button (ESC)
2 = Program button (PROG)
3 = Maintenance button (MAINT)
4 = Log button

Operator Access adds the ability to make operating parameter changes from the Program > Setpoint menu and provides the ability to transfer data from the controller.

To enable Operator Access, press and hold the Escape button (ESC) for two seconds. The screen will display Password. Enter the password 22 by pressing the Program button (PROG) twice followed by the Enter button.

Service Access allows the ability to make operating parameter changes from the Programs > Setpoint menu, add field options from the Programs > Programs > Options menu, and update the service history from the Maintenance (press 5 times) > Service History menu.

To enable Service Access, press and hold the Escape button (ESC) for two seconds. The screen will display Password. Enter the password 33 by pressing the Maintenance button twice followed by the Enter button.

ControllerBasicAccess To restore Basic Access, press and hold the Escape button (ESC) for two seconds. The screen will display the words Access Locked. Basic Access is also restore upon powering the controller off and on. Also, if the DEKKER Controller has no activity (no buttons pushed) for 5 minutes, it will default back to Basic Access. Any changes after the password times out will require the password to be re-entered.

 

Download the DEKKER Controller Security Access Levels PDF

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Dekker Controller Menus

For Use with DEKKER Vacuum Systems Equipped with the DEKKER Controller

Each Vmax system is tested and checked at the factory prior to shipment to ensure trouble-free operation. In the unlikely event you encounter a problem, we recommend that you consult with your local distributor for parts/service. Remember, when calling for service, parts or system information, always have the pump or system model number and serial number ready.

Click here to find your local authorized distributor

Program Menu

Note: The Security Access level must be changed from Basic Access to allow changes within the Setpoint (parameter) menu. Refer to the Dekker Controller Security Access Levels article for instructions on enabling Operator Access or Service Access.

Setpoint Menu (SETPOINTS)
Pressing the Program button (PROG) once displays the following Setpoint menu:

Vac Cut In
Vac Cut Out
Min Run Time
Temp Warn
BP Warn
DP Warn
Temp Fault
Time
Date
Vacuum Unit
Temp Unit
Autostart

 

SetpointsMenu

The Up arrow / button and the Down arrow / - button can be used to move the right-arrow cursor to the desired parameter. Pressing the Enter button will select that parameter for change. The value will begin to flash to indicate it is in the Edit mode.

Use the arrow buttons to change the value. Press the Enter button to save the new value. After the new value is changed, it will stop flashing.

 

Vac Cut In (Optional)
When in the Auto mode, a vacuum level at or below this value will cause the vacuum system to turn on. This value can be displayed in units of Torr (mm HgA) or in “HgV (inches of mercury vacuum). See menu item Vacuum Unit for changing the vacuum unit of measure.

Vac Cut Out (Optional)
When in the Auto mode, a vacuum level at or above (deeper vacuum) this value will cause the vacuum system to turn off. This value can be displayed in units of Torr (mm HgA) or in “HgV (inches of mercury vacuum). See menu item Vacuum Unit for changing the vacuum unit of measure.

Min Run Time
When in the Auto mode, short cycling is prevented by the Minimum Run Time feature. The setting for this feature is 10 minutes. At the end of the minimum run time (and if Vac Cut Out has been reached), the pump will stop and the Run Status LED will change from green to orange indicating Standby. The On light will remain green during Standby.

Temp Warn
If the pump is running or in Standby mode and the discharge temperature reaches this value, the warning message High Discharge Temp will be displayed. In addition, the Run Status light will be orange and will flash on and off. The pump will not be shut down by this warning condition.

BP Warn (Back Pressure Warning)
The Temperature and Back Pressure faults are adjustable from the setpoint screen, but it is not recommended to change these without consulting with a DEKKER Technician. BP Warn will give a message High Back Pressure. Temperature faults and warnings are settings critical; they are determined by the pump manufacturer and should not be changed without permission from DEKKER. BP Warnings and DP warnings are not so critical and not likely to do damage.

DP Warn (Differential Pressure Warning)
The Temperature and Back Pressure faults are adjustable from the setpoint screen, but it is not recommended to change these without consulting with a DEKKER Technician. DP Warn will give a Message on the screen High Differential Pressure. Temperature faults and warnings are settings critical; they are determined by the pump manufacturer and should not be changed without permission from DEKKER. BP Warnings and DP warnings are not so critical and not likely to do damage.

Temp Fault
If the pump is running or in Standby mode and the discharge temperature reaches this value, the message High Discharge Temp will be displayed. In addition, the Run Status light will be red and will flash on and off. The system will be shut down and the display will indicate Shutdown.

Time
The DEKKER Controller real-time clock may be viewed and changed from within this menu. The correct local time should be entered to ensure proper operation of time-dependent functions. The Up arrow / button and the Down arrow / - button can be used to set correct time.

Date
The calendar date should be entered in mm/dd/yy format. The Up arrow / button and the Down arrow / - button can be used to set the correct date.

Vacuum Unit
The vacuum level can be displayed in Torr or in “HgV. The Up arrow / button and the Down arrow / - button can be used to toggle between Torr and “HgV.

Temp Unit
The discharge temperature level can be displayed in Fahrenheit (F) or Celsius (C) units. The Up arrow / button and the Down arrow / - button can be used to toggle between F and C.

Autostart
This feature allows automatic restart of system when power returns from a power loss. To enable this feature press Program button (PROG) to show SETPOINTS screen. Use Down arrow to select Autostart. Press Enter. Use Up arrow to change to On. Press Enter to save. If system is multimachine, this must be set on all controllers.

 

Options Menu (SYSTEM OPTIONS)
Pressing the Program button (PROG) twice displays the following Options menu:

Inlet Filter
Hi Level Sw
Low Level Sw
Circ Pump
Relief Valve
Temp Valve
Solenoid
Temp Switch
Vac Switch
Aux Temp
DP Inlet
Back Pressure
No of Units
Remote Str

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Dekker Controller - Resetting the Hours to Next Service

For Use with DEKKER Vacuum Systems Equipped with the DEKKER Controller

Each Vmax system is tested and checked at the factory prior to shipment to ensure trouble-free operation. In the unlikely event you encounter a problem, we recommend that you consult with your local distributor for parts/service. Remember, when calling for service, parts or system information, always have the pump or system model number and serial number ready.

Click here to find your local authorized distributor

The DEKKER Controller is standard on the Vmax models. The DEKKER Controller provides for system control as well as monitoring of system status. Service functions include displays of spare parts list, maintenance schedules, service history and logging of fault conditions.

After a regularly scheduled service event such as an oil change or filter change has been performed on the Vmax system, the number of hours until the next service interval should be reset on the DEKKER Controller.

To reset the hours, Service Access must be enabled. Press and hold the Escape (ESC) button until you see the word Password on the controller screen. Press the Maintenance button twice to enter the service password 033 then press Enter. For more details on how to enable Service Access, refer to the related article DEKKER Controller Security Access Levels.

Press the Maintenance button until you see the Maintenance Schedule (MAINT SCHEDULES) screen.

HrsToSrv Use the Up/Down arrows to highlight Hrs To Srv then press Enter. Use the Up/Down arrows to change the hours to the next service interval. For example, if the current Hrs To Srv indicates 0 hours for the 1000-hour service warning, perform the indicated service, then use the Up/Down arrows to reset the value back to 1000.

 

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Applications

Do you have a crossover for “Insert Manufacturer Here” pump?

We carry many capacity equivalents and some direct bolt-in replacements for competitor’s pumps. Please visit the cross reference section on our website for more information. If your pump is not found here feel free to give us a call and we would be glad to help!

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How do I calculate my evacuation time?

Our Vacuum Fact Sheet has a section dedicated to the evacuation of a closed vessel. Please remember that pressures used must be in Absolute scale to work in this formula.

 

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How do I convert SCFM to ACFM?

Our Vacuum Fact Sheet has a section dedicated to the conversion of SCFM to ACFM. Please remember that pressures used must be in Absolute scale to work in this formula.

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How does seal water temperature effect the capacity of my liquid ring vacuum pump?

A general rule of thumb, warmer seal fluid will decrease capacity and the ultimate vacuum level achievable. Our website has a section dedicated to the seal water temperature effects on liquid ring vacuum pumps.

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What is the difference between a “M”, “K”, and “P” style liquid ring vacuum pump?

The “M” style liquid ring vacuum pump is a motor mounted vacuum pump. The vacuum pump is directly mounted on the motor, and the impeller is mounted on the motor shaft. This provides a cost effective solution and saves space.


The “K” style liquid ring vacuum pump is a Monoblock vacuum pump. The vacuum pump is mounted on a Monoblock assembly, which has a C-Face to accept a NEMA frame electric motor (Single stage up to 300 CFM). This provides a more robust solution as the pump and motor are connected with a flexible coupling.

The “P” style liquid ring vacuum pump is a pedestal vacuum pump. The vacuum pump is a bare shaft pump. This allows the customer to belt drive or direct drive this pump with any engine or motor technology.

All other single stage pumps (450 CFM and larger) are considered “K” style pumps, and are bare shaft pumps.
 

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What are the different vacuum applications by industry?

Vacuum Applications by Industry

You can also download our PDF which contains the different vacuum applications by industry

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What should be considered when sizing a knockout tank?

Each DEKKER system is tested and checked at the factory prior to shipment to ensure trouble-free operation. In the unlikely event you encounter a problem, we recommend that you consult with your local distributor for parts/service. Remember, when calling for service, parts or system information, always have the pump or system model number and serial number ready.

Click here to find your local authorized distributor

When sizing a knockout tank to put between the process and the vacuum system, there are many factors to consider. Please have the following information when contacting your DEKKER application specialist.

  • How much fluid is anticipated to be coming over from he process to the knockout tank (measured in gallons/minute)?
  • What is the process fluid that may be pulled into the knockout tank?
  • What is the temperature of the process fluid that may be pulled into the knockout tank?
  • What is the normal vacuum level at which the system will be operating?
  • Does the end user want a manual drain valve or a transfer pump to drain the knockout tank?
  • If a manual drain is desired, does the end user want a level switch added to protect against process upset?
  • If a transfer pump is desired, does the end user want it to be manually turned on and have a level switch to protect against
  • If a transfer pump is required, what are the control voltage requirements for the transfer pump?
  • Is there an area classification?
  • Are there any size restrictions for the knockout tank (either height or width restrictions)?
  • Will the end user require a clean out to be installed in the knockout tank?

You can download the PDF here

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Volatization and the vacuum infusion process

If you have produced a part with vacuum infusion, at some point you’ve probably noticed what appear to be air bubbles in the finished composite. Most likely, what you’ve seen isn’t simply air from the surrounding atmosphere due to a leak in the bag: it's vaporized resin! Understanding the relationship between resin selection, ambient temperature and vacuum pressure is critical to producing a properly cured part via vacuum infusion.

Recently, Polynova Composites participated in the evaluation of two polyester infusion resins. The test plans called for the production and testing of prototypical solid laminate test coupons wherein the resin system was the only variant. While the resin chemistries were thought to be similar, remarkably one system volatilized to the point of boiling at 24” HgV, whereas the other did so at 27” HgV at room temperature. Because boiling the resin would result in an unacceptable void content in the final part and vacuum pressure plays a critical role in the infusion process, Polynova Composites launched an investigation to better understand the factors involved.

Our goal was to improve understanding of the boiling behavior in the context of known characteristics of the resin systems. Thermodynamically, the boiling point of a liquid can be thought of as the disruption of equilibrium between thermal saturation and corresponding pressure saturation, where an increase in thermal energy or a decrease in pressure results in a phase change to the vapor state.

Download and read the full article here

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Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA)

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) was passed by Congress and signed into law on December 19, 2007.

The law affects the energy efficiency mandates for electric motors. EISA builds upon the previous EPAct (Energy Policy Act of 1992) updating mandated efficiency standards for general purpose, three-phase AC industrial motors from 1 to 500 horsepower which are manufactured for sale in the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for establishing the rules to implement and enforce EPAct.

All standard EPAct efficiency motors (subtype 1) shall meet the minimum NEMA premium efficiency standards as defined in NEMA M-G1 (2006) Table 1212. This will apply to motors from 1 to 200 HP. In addition, the minimal efficiency for all motors will be changed to meet Tare 1 design.

All motors rated at 201 to 500 HP that are manufactured for use in the United States and its territories shall meet the EPAct (2007) efficiency levels as established by the USC policy. The nominal full load efficiency is defined in NEMA MG-1 (2006) Table 1211. Standard efficiency motors will no longer be acceptable.

Fire-pump motors shall meet the EPAct (2007) standards. The nominal full-load efficiency requirements are defined in NEMA MG-1 (2006) Table 1211.

The following motors which were previously excluded from energy legislation are now included in the Energy Policy and Conversation Act of 2007. These motors will now be required to meet the energy efficiency standards based on NEMA MG-1 (2006) Table 1211 as the minimum nominal efficiency.

  • All U-Frame Manufactured Motors
  • Quarry Duty or Design-C Torque Motors
  • Close-Coupled Pump Motors
  • All Footless Frame Motors
  • Vertical Solid Shaft Motors - Normal Thrust Design
  • All 8-Pole Motors (900 RPM)
  • Induction Motors with Voltages Other than 230/460 V, but Not Greater than 600 V [Policy Update April 2, 2009]

Many of the vacuum systems produced by DEKKER Vacuum Technologies use Baldor electric motors. Baldor has produced an FAQ document that answers many of the questions asked about how the new EISA standards impact the motors they produce. Please see the link below to read the entire document.

Baldor FAQ document

Remember, when calling for service, parts or system information, always have the pump or system model number and serial number ready.

Click here to find your local authorized distributor

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IEC Enclosure Types

From IEC 529 "Definition of Protection Grades"

The specific enclosure Types, their applications, and the environmental conditions they are designed to protect against, when completely and properly installed, are indicated by the IP number where the first IP digit indicates the degree of contact prevention and guarding against foreign objects and the second digit indicates the degree of water protection.

1st I.P. Digit

0 No protection No protection of personnel from direct contact with active or moving parts. No protection from access of solid foreign object.
1 Protection against large foreign bodies Protection of personnel from accidental large area direct contact with active or internal moving parts (hand contact, etc.) but no guard against intentional access to such parts. Protection from access of solid foreign object larger than 50 mm in diameter.
2 Protection against medium foreign bodies Protection of personnel from finger contact with active or internal moving parts. Protection from access of solid foreign object larger than 12 mm in diameter.
3 Protection against small foreign bodies Protection of personnel from touching active or internal moving parts with tools, wires or similar foreign objects thicker than 2.5 mm in diameter.
4 Protection against granular foreign bodies Protection of personnel from touching active or internal moving parts with tools, wires or similar foreign objects thicker than 1 mm.
5 Protection from deposit of dust Total protection of personnel from touching voltage carrying or internal moving parts. Protection from harmful deposit of dust. Access of dust is not completely prevented.
6 Protection from access of dust Total protection of personnel from touching voltage carrying or internal moving parts. Protection from access of dust.

 

2nd I.P. Digit

0 No protection No special protection.
1 Protection against water dripping vertically Water drops falling vertically must not have any harmful effect.
2 Protection against water dripping off vertically Water drops falling at any angle up to 15 degrees from the vertical must not have any harmful effect.
3 Protection against spray water Water hitting the object at any angle up to 60 degrees with the vertical must not have any harmful effect.
4 Protection against splash water Water splashing against the object from all directions must not have any harmful effect.
5 Protection against jet water A jet of water nozzled from all directions must not have any harmful effect.
6 Protection against flooding Water from a temporary flooding, such as heavy seas, must not enter it in any harmful quantity.
7 Protection in dipped state If the object is dipped into water under the defined conditions of pressure and time, water must not enter it in any way.
8 Protection in submerged state If the object is submerged in water, water must not enter in any harmful quantity.

 

Remember, when calling for service, parts or system information, always have the pump or system model number and serial number ready.

Click here to find your local authorized distributor

Download the PDF of the IEC Enclosure Types

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Motor Amperage Calculations

How to Calculate Actual Amp Rating from Motor Nameplate Data of a Different Voltage

Each DEKKER vacuum system is tested and checked at the factory prior to shipment to ensure trouble-free operation. In the unlikely event you encounter a problem; we recommend that you consult with your local distributor for parts/service. Remember, when calling for service, parts or system information, always have the pump or system model number and serial number ready.

Click here to find your local authorized distributor

Some pumps are equipped with a universal motor that is designed to run at a wide variety of voltages and frequencies. Nameplate data on these motors will show the acceptable voltage range for low-voltage and high-voltage setup at both 50Hz and 60Hz.

An example of a typical universal motor nameplate is:

 

175/300 V 4.0/2.3 AMP 1390 RPM 50 HZ 0.75 KW 1.0 HP 0.75PF
260/450 V 3.8/2.2 AMP 1390 RPM 50 HZ 0.75 KW 1.0 HP 0.75PF
200/346 V 4.3/2.5 AMP 1680 RPM 60 HZ 0.90 KW 1.2 HP 0.77PF
300/520 V 3.8/2.2 AMP 1680 RPM 60 HZ 0.90 KW 1.2 HP 0.77PF

 

In this example, the top line would be the low-voltage specifications at 50Hz. Wire the motor using the low-voltage diagram for power that is 50Hz with voltage between 175 and 300 volts.

The second line would be the high-voltage specification at 50Hz. Wire the motor using the high-voltage diagram for power that is 50Hz with voltage between 200 and 346 volts.

The third line is the low-voltage specification at 60Hz and the fourth line is the high-voltage specification at 60Hz.

In our example, nameplate amperage for low-voltage at 60Hz (line 3) is 4.3 amps at 200 volts and 2.5 amps at 346 volts. To determine the nameplate amperage for a specific voltage between 200 volts and 346 volts, use the following formula:

Nameplate Amps / Actual Voltage x Nameplate Voltage

For example, if the actual voltage available is 230 volts, our formula would be:

4.3 (nameplate amps) / 230 (actual voltage) x 200 (nameplate voltage) = 3.74 amps

Download the PDF for Motor Amperage Calculations

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NEMA Enclosure Types

From NEMA 250-2003 "Enclosures for Electrical Equipment (1,000 Volts Maximum)"

In Non-hazardous locations, the specific enclosure Types, their applications, and the environmental conditions they are designed to protect against, when completely and properly installed, are as follows:

NEMA Type 1  Enclosures constructed for indoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts and to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt).

NEMA Type 2  Enclosures constructed for indoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt); and to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (dripping and light splashing).

NEMA Type 3 Enclosures constructed for either indoor or outdoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt and windblown dust); to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (rain, sleet, snow); and that will be undamaged by the external formation of ice on the enclosure.

NEMA Type 3R Enclosures constructed for either indoor or outdoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt); to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (rain, sleet, snow); and that will be undamaged by the external formation of ice on the enclosure.

NEMA Type 3S Enclosures constructed for either indoor or outdoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt and windblown dust); to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (rain, sleet, snow); and for which the external mechanism(s) remain operable when ice laden.

NEMA Type 3X Enclosures constructed for either indoor or outdoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt and windblown dust); to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (rain, sleet, snow); that provides an additional level of protection against corrosion and that will be undamaged by the external formation of ice on the enclosure.

NEMA Type 3RX Enclosures constructed for either indoor or outdoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt); to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (rain, sleet, snow); that will be undamaged by the external formation of ice on the enclosure that provides an additional level of protection against corrosion; and that will be undamaged by the external formation of ice on the enclosure.

NEMA Type 3SX Enclosures constructed for either indoor or outdoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt and windblown dust); to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (rain, sleet, snow); that provides an additional level of protection against corrosion; and for which the external mechanism(s) remain operable when ice laden.

NEMA Type 4 Enclosures constructed for either indoor or outdoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt and windblown dust); to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (rain, sleet, snow, splashing water, and hose directed water); and that will be undamaged by the external formation of ice on the enclosure.

NEMA Type 4X Enclosures constructed for either indoor or outdoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (windblown dust); to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (rain, sleet, snow, splashing water, and hose directed water); that provides an additional level of protection against corrosion; and that will be undamaged by the external formation of ice on the enclosure.

NEMA Type 5 Enclosures constructed for indoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt and settling airborne dust, lint, fibers, and flyings); and to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (dripping and light splashing).

NEMA Type 6 Enclosures constructed for either indoor or outdoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt); to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (hose directed water and the entry of water during occasional temporary submersion at a limited depth); and that will be undamaged by the external formation of ice on the enclosure.

NEMA Type 6P Enclosures constructed for either indoor or outdoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt); to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (hose directed water and the entry of water during prolonged submersion at a limited depth); that provides an additional level of protection against corrosion and that will be undamaged by the external formation of ice on the enclosure.

NEMA Type 12 Enclosures constructed (without knockouts) for indoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt and circulating dust, lint, fibers, and flyings); and to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (dripping and light splashing).

NEMA Type 12K Enclosures constructed (with knockouts) for indoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt and circulating dust, lint, fibers, and flyings); and to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (dripping and light splashing).

NEMA Type 13 Enclosures constructed for indoor use to provide a degree of protection to personnel against access to hazardous parts; to provide a degree of protection of the equipment inside the enclosure against ingress of solid foreign objects (falling dirt and circulating dust, lint, fibers, and flyings); to provide a degree of protection with respect to harmful effects on the equipment due to the ingress of water (dripping and light splashing); and to provide a degree of protection against the spraying, splashing, and seepage of oil-immersed and non-corrosive coolants.

In Hazardous Locations, when completely and properly installed and maintained, Type 7 and 10 enclosures are designed to contain an internal explosion without causing an external hazard. Type 8 enclosures are designed to prevent combustion through the use of oil-immersed equipment. Type 9 enclosures are designed to prevent the ignition of combustible dust.

NEMA Type 7 Enclosures constructed for indoor use in hazardous (classified) locations classified as Class I, Division 1, Groups A, B, C, or D as defined in NFPA 70.

NEMA Type 8 Enclosures constructed for either indoor or outdoor use in hazardous (classified) locations classified as Class I, Division 1, Groups A, B, C, and D as defined in NFPA 70.

NEMA Type 9 Enclosures constructed for indoor use in hazardous (classified) locations classified as Class II, Division 1, Groups E, F, or G as defined in NFPA 70.

NEMA Type 10 Enclosures constructed to meet the requirements of the Mine Safety and Health Administration, 30 CFR, Part 18.

Remember, when calling for service, parts or system information, always have the pump or system model number and serial number ready.

Click here to find your local authorized distributor.

Download the NEMA Enclosures Types PDF

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NEMA to IEC Enclosure Rating Cross-Reference

Note: This cross-reference table is an approximation of NEMA and IEC classifications for reference only. Please consult the appropriate agencies’ requirements and test qualifications for complete information.

NEMA TYPE IP 23 IP 30 IP 32 IP 64 IP 65 IP 66 IP 67
1 X            
2   X          
3       X      
3R     X        
4           X  
4X           X  
6             X
12         X    
13         X    

 

Remember, when calling for service, parts or system information, always have the pump or system model number and serial number ready.

Click here to find your local authorized distributor

Download the NEMA to IEC Enclosure Rating Cross-Reference PDF

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How can I determine my vacuum needs?

Determining your vacuum needs is the most important stage of any system decision-making process.  Incomplete or inaccurate information can lead to delays in the quoting process and can result in incorrect pump sizing, either of which is detrimental to the application’s success.  In order to determine if you have all of the required information needed to find the best vacuum solution possible, please provide a specification and answer the following questions.

Vacuum Needs Analysis - Baseline Questions:

  1. What is the application?
    a.)  Is it a wet or a dry application?
  • For wet applications, usually a liquid ring pump system is the correct choice for this application
  • For dry applications, most types of vacuum pumps can be used

      b.)  Is it a dirty or clean application?

  • This usually determines that either a liquid ring pump system be used and/or an inlet filter is required.
     
  1. Are there any vapors being pulled into the pump?
  • This is important, because vapors may be corrosive and could condense in the pump affecting the seal liquid’s vapor pressure, performance and material compatibility.  The amount of vapor (or concentration) is also important in order to determine how significant the affect will be on the vacuum pump.
     
  1. Is the pump a replacement?
    -  Obtain as much information as possible about the existing pump.  (i.e. model, HP, serial #, manufacturer, etc.)
     
  2. What is the required capacity? 
  • Is the information given to you in ACFM or SCFM?  If there is confusion, it’s a good idea to determine the motor size on the existing pump.
  • What is the operating vacuum level?  If you are unsure, see if you can have a Dekker Vacuum Expert help to determine this or take a look at the pump in operation.  
  • What is the maximum vacuum required?  Be careful with this number versus the operating vacuum level.  Many times customers indicate that they need as much vacuum as they can get or may state that they desire a maximum of 29”Hg.  However, the customers may not realize that there is a dramatic difference in the size (and price) of a vacuum system specified at 25”Hg versus 29”Hg.  The characteristics of vacuum pumps are such that their performance curves drop off in the higher vacuum range and air leakage expands at high vacuum 5 times more at 29” Hg as compared with 25” Hg. 
     
  1. Have you been pleased with the performance of your current pump?
  • You may not be using the best pump for this application.  Specifically list what problems you have been experiencing.
  • What about maintenance?  Do the existing pumps require a great deal of maintenance?  Different pumps require different levels of maintenance.  Choose the pump type that is best suited for your organization.
  • Are you pleased with the performance of your current supplier?  If not, why not?
  1. Determine the general operating conditions of the application
  • What are the minimum and maximum ambient temperatures, vacuum pump inlet temperature, altitude, electrical utilities and water availability (flowrate and temperature).
  • Determine the electrical utilities on the site as well as the motor enclosure and control panel enclosure required.
     
  1. Do you just want to replace the existing unit, or would you like to oversize for future expansion?  Are you interested in a exploring the benefits of a central system?
     
  2. How quickly do you need a vacuum solution?  By indicating priority level when requesting a quotation helps potential suppliers to provide quotations quickly and efficiently. 
     
  3. How quickly do you need the equipment?  Have funds been budgeted for the purchase of the equipment?  Would you prefer a rental or a lease?
     

10.) Who else have you considered to help you with this purchase?  This will allow a vacuum expert to inform you of the best options available in the market.

 

Requesting a Quotation:

When you have collected the above information send it to Dekkers’ Vacuum Experts. The Sales engineers at Dekker will provide you with the pump best suited for the application.  Be sure to state when you need the by to help us prioritize requests.

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I have an older condenser exhauster that consists of a single stage liquid ring vacuum pump and an atmospheric air ejector. It seems to have really fallen off in capacity. What’s the problem?

These types of exhausters were popular prior to the mid-1970’s but, unfortunately, did not equal their published capacities.  They did, however, perform adequately when the condenser leaks were eliminated enough to be less than the ‘true’ capacity of the exhausters.  Their reduced capacities became very apparent when they were ‘partnered’ with properly rated exhausters such as two-stage liquid rings, reciprocating units, etc.   It is reasonable when the exhauster changes to the ‘holding’ mode and the atmospheric [motive] air is allowed to enter through the jet nozzle, the net vacuum pump capacity drops significantly because it must now handle the motive air as well as the air/ water vapor mixture being pulled from the condenser.  There is some adiabatic cooling that reduces some of the water vapor load, but it is not enough to make up the difference. 

 

In addition to this type of exhauster being undersized, as the power plant has aged, more leaks have appeared [it happens to the best of us] and one of the primary source of leaks is within the exhauster itself. 

  • Check out the shaft seals [most of these units have packing that is famous for leaking inward].
  • Check out the two control valves associated with the air ejector ---- one for the air ejector bypass and one for the motive air.  At roughly 5”HgA, the bypass valve closes and the motive air valve opens.  Improper seating of these two valves can cause a large loss in performance.  Unfortunately, many of these valves were custom-made and parts may no longer be available.

Air-Jet_Exhauster_Diagram

 

More than likely, your older model exhauster, even at its reduced capacity, has given you many years of good 24/7 service.  Maybe it’s time to consider upgrading to a two-stage liquid ring exhauster with mechanical shaft seals as well as anti-cavitation features to include a stainless steel rotor.   

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I have a pair of steam ejectors that are currently holding the vacuum on the main condenser and I want to replace those with mechanical vacuum pumps. How do I determine what size pumps to use?

You can check the original data sheets from the ejector manufacturer, if available and check the sizing data, such as dry air load. Or otherwise you need to obtain a copy of a document published by the Heat Exchange Institute [HEI] entitled “Standards for Steam Surface Condensers.” See table attached.  You will need the following data:

  • Number of Condenser Shells (enclosures) – usually one, but sometimes two or three.
  • Number of main openings --- these are the exhausts from the main turbines that drive the generators --- typically one but maybe more.
  • Number of total openings --- includes the main openings as well as auxiliary openings, such as those from turbines driving the boiler feed pumps.
  • Total steam load to the condenser ---- expressed in lbs/hr.

Procedure:

  • Find the table for the appropriate number of condenser shells.
  • Divide the total steam load by the number of main exhaust openings and use this number to find the appropriate effective steam flow in the left column of the table.
  • Look in this row to find the column corresponding to the number of exhaust openings.
  • The top number in the appropriate box will be the SCFM requirement, which is the dry air component to which we have to add the amount of water vapor it takes to saturate the mixture. It is important to know that although the number is in SCFM, the condenser exhauster should be able handle this amount of air leakage at an inlet pressure of 1” HgA.

The following example assumes a single shell condenser with two main openings, two auxiliary openings and a total steam load of 1,200,000 lbs/hr. We check the HEI table “A” for One Condenser Shell and divide the total steam load by the number of openings, which gives us a an effective steam load for each opening of 300,000 lbs/hr. Refer to the left column and pick the row applicable for 250,000 – 500,000. Go to the right and pick the column for 4 openings and we find a SCFM requirement of 20. This is the number required by the vacuum pump manufacturer to do the sizing.

Two stage liquid ring vacuum pumps are generally considered to be the most cost efficient for this application but in addition to the SCFM requirement it is very important to know the cooling water requirement at the operating point --- the colder the water, the better the performance. In fact it is best to have the same water temperature supplied to the heat exchanger of the vacuum pump as the cooling water temperature supplied to the condenser.  The cooling water temperature supplied to the condenser will dictate the condenser pressure that can be achieved and somewhere in the original condenser design data you will find the design condition based on the cooling water temperature,  for example: 1.5” HgA with 67deg. F cooling water.

Once all the data is available the next decision is how many vacuum pumps are required to cover the total HEI requirement, i.e. one 100% unit or two 50% units but often two 100% units are installed.

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Are your packaged medical vacuum pump systems OSHPD Special Seismic Certification Preapproval (OSP) approved?

Seismic certification is not standard on our NFPA 99 compliant packages, but can be quoted as a custom option. Please contact our Applications Engineering team for further assistance.

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What would be the pipe sizing for my inlet connection to the vacuum pump?

Typically we do not recommend pipe sizing without looking at the installation, however you can review our IOM manuals for additional installation information.

https://www.dekkervacuum.com/resource-library/literature/installation-operation-and-maintenance-manuals/

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What is the recommended way to install the discharge piping on a Vmax system?

Please find page 12 of the IOM here -

https://www.dekkervacuum.com/assets/1/6/VMAX_with_Dekker_Controller_-_2015.pdf

We do not recommend installation parameters beyond that of the IOM without seeing the installation. Please contact your local distributor for further assistance.

https://www.dekkervacuum.com/locations/

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Can you provide more details on your Dekker Controller?

Our Vmax IOM manual should be able to assist better -

https://www.dekkervacuum.com/assets/1/6/VMAX_with_Dekker_Controller_-_2015.pdf

https://www.dekkervacuum.com/resource-library/knowledge-database/controller-operation-electrical/

If you need additional assistance, please feel free to contact us at 1-888-925-5444.

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Why Saturated air vacuum pump capacity is more than dry air?

At certain conditions, a liquid ring pump can act as a condenser as well as a vacuum pump, increasing its capacity. See our related articles below -

https://www.dekkervacuum.com/resource-library/knowledge-database/technical-data/conversion-factors-saturateddry-air-for-liquid-ring-vacuum-pumps/

https://www.dekkervacuum.com/resource-library/knowledge-database/technical-data/effect-of-saturated-air-service-on-the-capacity-of-liquid-ring-vacuum-pumps/

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General FAQs

Where is Dekker Vacuum Technologies, Inc. company located?

935 S. Woodland Ave.
Michigan City, IN 46360
United States

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How long has DEKKER Vacuum Technologies, Inc. been in business?

DEKKER Vacuum Technologies, Inc. was established in 1998.

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The Vacuum Fact Sheet

Download the DEKKER Vacuum Fact Sheet

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Bronzoni pump motor retrofit required. DV0100AMA2 pump.Ser#9906823. Is it best to replace both motor and pump(entire assembly)?

Replied 3/23/2017 via email.

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Pumps

What are the classifications of vacuum ranges?

There are many different units and classifications of vacuum, and typically our pumps would fall in the "Rough" or "Medium" vacuum ranges.

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What is the difference between Absolute and Gauge pressure?

See our article on "What Is Vacuum?"

https://www.dekkervacuum.com/resource-library/knowledge-database/technical-data/what-is-vacuum/

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What is the difference between Standard Cubic Feet per minute (SCFM) and Actual Cubic feet per Minute (ACFM)?

See our article "Inlet Volume Calculations"

https://www.dekkervacuum.com/resource-library/knowledge-database/technical-data/inlet-volume-calculations/

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What is Cavitation and how does it affect the performance of a liquid ring vacuum pump?

Cavitation can occur when trying to achieve a deep level of vacuum. The seal fluid (water) rapidly evaporates and creates small pockets of gas near the tips of the impeller blades. These pockets of gas collapse and can cause damage to the pump. Cavitation can usually be identified by a pinging or loud noise during operation. See our article below for more information.

https://www.dekkervacuum.com/resource-library/knowledge-database/technical-data/effect-of-service-water-temperature-on-capacity-of-liquid-ring-vacuum-pumps/

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How does the operating temperature of Sealing liquid influence the capacity and vacuum level attained by a liquid ring vacuum pump?

See our article below -

https://www.dekkervacuum.com/resource-library/knowledge-database/technical-data/effect-of-service-water-temperature-on-capacity-of-liquid-ring-vacuum-pumps/

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What is the lowest speed of operation of a liquid ring vacuum pump?

This varies, but many pumps can have as much as a 40% turndown ratio. Please contact the factory for assistance.

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Does the vacuum pump performance change with altitude?

See our article below -

https://www.dekkervacuum.com/resource-library/knowledge-database/technical-data/altitude-effect-on-the-operation-of-liquid-ring-vacuum-pumps/

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What are the suction pressure ranges of different vacuum pumps?

Please see the performance curves of each individual pump to find the ultimate vacuum achievable.

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Can your rotary vane pumps be used with a VFD (Variable Frequency Drive)?

The rotary vane pumps can only operate on 50Hz or 60Hz and cannot be used with a VFD.

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How can we find out the dimension of the shaft of your pumps?

You can find the specification pages in our Products and Parts section of the website. These include product drawings and show shaft dimensions.

https://www.dekkervacuum.com/store/?cid=titan

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We are looking for DVP Vacuum Pumps & Parts, can you assist?

Yes, we carry DVP vacuum pumps and parts. Please contact us at the main office for assistance.

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Sales

Are vacuum pumps or systems available for rent or lease?

Dekker Vacuum Technologies offers rental and leasing programs upon request. Our rental fleet includes Vmax systems in a wide range of capacities.
Please contact our
sales@dekkervacuum.com or call us at 1-888-925-5444 for more information.

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Is there a distributor in this area?

Dekker Vacuum Technologies has an extensive network of distributors. Please contact our sales@dekkervacuum.com or call us at 1-888-925-5444 for more information.

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How Much Is ½”Hg Vacuum Worth To You?

QUESTION:
If one of our vacuum pumps could improve your condenser vacuum by a half-inch of mercury (0.5”HgA) what would it be worth?

ANSWER:
Each plant has different operating characteristics, but calculating the answer is simply a matter of gathering some data and multiplying.
 

  1. In your “Turbine Data File” there should be a graph or table that shows Turbine Efficiency Improvement as a function of turbine back pressure [condenser absolute pressure]. We recently saw one that indicated a 0.3% improvement if the back pressure were dropped from 2.5”HgA to 2.0”HgA.
  2. Determine the Turbine Heat Rate, which is the Btu input to the turbine required to produce a kilowatt of electricity. A typical value is about 8500 Btu/kW.
  3. Determine the cost of fuel. A recent spot price for natural gas was $2.50 per million Btu's.


Use the following calculation: 


[0.003] [8500 Btu / kW-hr] [$2.50 / 106 Btu] = 6.375 x 10-5 $ / kW


This appears to be insignificant until we factor in the amount of power produced over an entire year. If the plant is rated at 500 MegaWatts (500,000 kW) and it operates 8000 hours per year:


[6.375 x 10-5 $ / kW] [5 x 105 kW] [8 x 103 hr] = $ 255,000 per year

Now that's a figure worth considering! A fraction of this will purchase a healthy sized vacuum pump. All of this, however, depends on the conditions at your particular plant. Plug in your own data and see if it’s worth sending us an inquiry.


Call us at 1-888-925-5444 or e-mail us at sales@dekkervacuum.com

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Can I improve my pull-down time?

QUESTION:

I want to use an older power plant for peaking service and would like to bring it on line quickly. I use steam ejectors to hog [evacuate] the condenser and therefore I have to wait for the steam pressure to get high enough to operate them efficiently. Can I improve my pull-down time with a mechanical vacuum pump?.

ANSWER:

The answer is almost always a resounding 'Yes'. If you check out the Standard Handbook for Mechanical Engineers [Baumeister & Marks, 7th Edition published in 1966], page 9-93 has a graph which nicely compares the performance of ejectors versus vacuum pumps on condenser service. 

HoggingTimeGraph

 

An ejector is a 'mass-moving' device that is designed for one narrow operating range, and it decreases in performance on either side of its design point. That's why an additional, larger hogging ejector is generally designed to have peak performance at 10”HgA, whereas the holding ejector is generally designed for 1”HgA. A mechanical vacuum pump, on the other hand, is a 'volumetric' device which moves larger amounts of air at higher pressure [lower vacuum] and can evacuate higher volumes more quickly.

Also, the electrically driven vacuum pump can be turned on immediately. The only limiting factor may be the time to effectively seal the turbine glands with steam.

Vacuum pumps used for hogging service are usually single-stage devices because they are only required to operate down to about 5”HgA. It makes sense to seriously consider purchasing a unit that will also operate in the holding range. The ejectors can be kept in place to act as back-up.

Call us at 1-888-925-5444 or e-mail us at sales@dekkervacuum.com 

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