FAQs

FAQ Categories

Accounting

Customer Service

After Sales/Service

Applications

Sales

Questions & Answers

Accounting

What are the standard terms given to your customers?

Refer to our TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE.

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What forms of payment do you accept?

Refer to the Payment Terms section of our TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE.

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What are your credit terms?

Refer to our TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE.

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Customer Service

What is your billing address?

Dekker Vacuum Technologies, Inc

935 S. Woodland Avenue
Michigan City, IN 46360

Contact Dekker

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What are your office hours?

Office Hours:
Monday-Friday
7:30a-4:30p (CST)

Please contact DEKKER.

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Who can I speak with to get an estimate on freight charges?

Please contact Customer Service at 219-861-0661 

Contact DEKKER.

 

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When is our order shipping?

You will find this information on the copy of the Sales Order that has been e-mailed, and/or faxed,to you as confirmation of your purchase order.

Contact DEKKER.

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Can the shipping date of our pump or system be moved up?

We can, on occasion, move up a shipping date, depending on availability of pumps, parts, and production schedule. We will do everything in our power to accommodate your request. For details, please contact  our Customer Service Department or call 1-888-925-5444.

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Has our order shipped and what is the pro # ?

When an order is shipped an email and/or fax is sent to the customer immediately after the freight company has picked up the order. The company pro # and truck line name will be stated on the e-mail, and/or fax. If you have any tracking question, please contact the freight carrier direct.

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Which truck line would get our shipment here the fastest?

Please provide ship-to zip code to our Customer Service Department.  They will complete the research get back to you as soon as possible with the information. Please contact Customer Service at 1-888-925-5444 for more information.

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How much will the freight for our shipment be?

Once we have all the details, such as ship-to address, shipping method and weight of merchandise, we can provide you with this information. Please contact Customer Service at 1-888-925-5444 for more information.

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After Sales/Service

Why is my pump not pulling vacuum?

Check all vacuum lines going from your process to the vacuum pump. Are there any leaks allowing air to bleed in? Listen for hissing noise and correct any leaks. If the system is an Aqua-Sealed pump to which you supply the seal fluid, make sure that the pump is receiving adequate flow of seal fluid. Use a compound gauge in the seal fluid line to determine whether positive pressure or negative pressure exists. If unable to determine a source of the issue, contact Dekker for additional assistance. Dekker technician will ask how the pump is connected to the process and seal fluid, and may require photos or a piping diagram. Please have this information available when calling as it will ensure the best chances of resolving your issue.

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What would cause my pump, which has been on a shelf or in storage, to lock up?

Without proper storage procedures, pump models that have Cast Iron materials, may have residual seal fluid in the pump that could cause oxidation to occur on the internal components of the pump. This results in rust interference against the impeller due to tight clearances. Clearances between the impeller and port plates can be 0.007” or roughly the thickness of 2 sheets of notebook paper. Spraying the locked up components with a rust penetrator such as ‘PB Blast’ can help free up seized components. 

Pumps on VMX oil-sealed systems do not require special storage fluid if the pump is primed with Standard or Synthetic Vmax Oil.

All pumps or systems that will be stored for long-term need to follow the Long Term Storage procedure in the IOM manual. Part of which is that every 2-3 weeks rotate impeller 2¼ turns. This will allow storage fluid or oil to pass through the blades and cavities of the impeller, and ensure that the shaft and bearings rest on a new spot.

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Why is my Vmax system shutting down on Hi Temperature?

There are two roots causes for a Vmax overheating.

1) Not enough air moving through the heat exchanger

  • Check for debris in and around the heat exchanger and particulates covering heat exchanger fins. While system is off, shine a light through the heat exchanger fins to see if light shines through, since debris can become compacted in the heat exchanger fins where it can not be seen.

 2) Not enough GPM of oil making it to the pump 

  • If the unit overheats in <25 min, this is an indication of no oil flow.
    • Check the oil valve under tank next to y-strainer and verify that it is open. Check to make sure that the oil solenoid is energizing by hovering a piece of ferrous metal above the coil (metal should be attracted to the coil). Check the sight glass to see if oil is visible and not over the high level mark as this is a indicator of no oil flow to the pump.
  • If the unit overheats in >25 min, this is an indication of improper oil flow, contact factory.

If the above does not correct the issue, please contact the factory 888-925-5444 and ask for the After Sales/Service Department.

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I just received my new Vmax system. Why is there no oil visible in the sight gauge (sight glass)?

The system is shipped with a full charge of oil. Check for any visible leaks. If none are located, then the oil is still in the tank. The separator tank has an internal liquid tank with an open top.  Some oil may have migrated to the outer shell (which is the tank you can see from the outside) during shipment. Run the system for 2 hours at deep vacuum (27" HgV) to pull the oil from the outer shell back into the internal liquid tank.

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Why is oil leaking all over the floor from the end of the Vmax pump?

This is most likely a mechanical seal leak. Please contact the factory 888-925-5444 and ask for the After Sales/Service Department.

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Why am I getting a Contactor Fault on my screen?

The Motor Contactor status is monitored by the Controller/PLC. If the Contactor has not energized when requested by the Controller/PLC, the fault message will appear. 

For assistance, please contact the factory 888-925-5444 and ask for the After Sales/Service Department.

 

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Why is the VFD in my control panel is showing a fault?

If the VFD in a control panel is showing a fault, log the fault and contact Dekker factory. 

For assistance, please contact the factory 888-925-5444 and ask for the After Sales/Service Department.

 

 

 

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Why is my Vmax system have excessive oil carryover out of the discharge?

Running the system at shallow vacuum levels will cause the oil to blow through the separator exhaust filter element. 

Click the link:Vmax - Wood Routing Application Guide where you will find a section on oil carryover.

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My shipment was delivered with noticeable Freight Damage. What should I do?

It is the responsibility of the recipient of the Freight to inspect the entire skid prior to signing for the shipment. If the skid has any noticeable damage, shrink wrap is missing, wooden skid is broken, etc. the DAMAGE MUST BE NOTED ON BOTH COPIES OF THE BILL OF LADING, INCLUDING THE DRIVER’S BILL OF LADING! Undiscovered damage usually has a 1 week grace period. If the system has a control panel, Dekker strongly suggests that the customer inspects the internals, and apply power to ensure that the panel was not damaged in transit as well. Dekker will not absorb freight claims that are not honored by the Freight Carrier.

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How do I get replacement parts for a Freight Claim?

The following is only applicable if Freight Damage was noted properly on both copies of Bill Of Lading (BOL), and the Freight Carrier has been notified.  If the recipient pre-paid for freight (Third-Party Bill or Collect), they must purchase replacement parts from Dekker and file them on a Freight Claim. If Dekker paid for shipping (Pre-Paid), they will provide the replacement parts and file against the Freight Company.

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Why has my pump failed?

For assistance, please contact the factory 888-925-5444 and ask for the After Sales/Service Department. 

Have the model and serial number available. Please be prepared to discuss the nature of the failure with our After Sales Representative. If we are unable to resolve the issue and you choose to send the pump in for repair evaluation, Dekker can issue an RMA (Return Material Authorization).

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I will not be using my pump immediately upon receipt, is there anything I should do to prepare them for temporary storage?

Without proper storage procedures, pump models that have Cast Iron materials, may have residual seal fluid in the pump that could cause oxidation to occur on the internal components of the pump. This results in rust interference against the impeller due to tight clearances. Clearances between the impeller and port plates can be 0.007” or roughly the thickness of 2 sheets of notebook paper. Spraying the locked up components with a rust penetrator such as ‘PB Blast’ can help free up seized components. 

Pumps on VMX oil-sealed systems do not require special storage fluid if the pump is primed with Standard or Synthetic Vmax Oil.

All pumps or systems that will be stored for long-term need to follow the Long Term Storage procedure in the IOM manual. Part of which is that every 2-3 weeks rotate impeller 2¼ turns. This will allow storage fluid or oil to pass through the blades and cavities of the impeller, and ensure that the shaft and bearings rest on a new spot.

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What is the lowest speed of operation of a liquid ring vacuum pump?

This varies, but many pumps can have as much as a 40% turndown ratio. For assistance, please contact the factory 888-925-5444 and ask for the After Sales/Service Department.

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What is the difference between a mechanical seal leak and a weep?

Seals work by having two flat seal faces pushed together by axial force from the closing mechanism and by product pressure in the seal chamber. When the seal is in operation, the two faces are lubricated by the seal fluid (in our case, oil).

This thin film of lubrication protects the faces of the seal from heat and excessive wear but can allow a minute amount of leakage across the seal face. This minute leakage is called a weep. While a weep has rather arbitrary limits, it is commonly considered to be a leakage rate of less than one drop of liquid per minute.  Anything greater than 1 drop per minute is considered to be a leak.

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Where can I find the Installation and Operation Manual?

Every pump and system has an IOM attached, as well as the Warranty Card and a Start-up Record, inside a plastic sleeve when it leaves the factory. If it is missing, please check with your Receiving Department, as they may have removed some of the paperwork. The Operating Manuals for our Vmax, AquaSeal, ChemSeal, and DuraVane systems can also be found in our Resource Library on our website in the Literature section. If necessary, we can send you another hardcopy. Please contact aftersales@dekkervacuum.com or call us at 1-888-925-5444 for more information.

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My Vmax is low on seal fluid. Is it ok to run?

As long as oil is visible in the sight glass, it is safe to run until more oil can be added.

Verify that you have properly checked your oil level. This is done with the pump running, at a vacuum level of 25 inHg. The oil level should be near the centerline of the sight glass.

 

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Why is there white smoke blowing out of the exhaust of my Vmax?

Please see the Oil Carryover section of our Vmax - Wood Routing Application Guide.

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Should I see oil circulating through my scavenger lines on my Vmax?

Occasionally oil may circulate through the scavenger lines. However, if you have continuous OR no oil circulating through the lines please contact the factory 888-925-5444 and ask for the After Sales/Service Department to determine if this a normal condition for your process.

 

 

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Why is there black oil circulating through my bearing scavenger lines at the bottom of the housings on my Vmax?

This may indicate a mechanical seal failure. 

For assistance, please contact the factory 888-925-5444 and ask for the After Sales/Service Department.

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Why is my Vmax overheating?

Please refer to the Troubleshooting section of the Vmax IOM Manual located in the Resource Library of our website.

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Can I modify my DEKKER system to operate with a different supply voltage other than what is marked on the control panel?

DEKKER systems (units) that are supplied with control panels are designed and built to operate at a specific voltage. Field modifications to change the operating voltage is usually not recommended. The installation of an upstream transformer to covert the supply voltage to match the system voltage is the preferred solution. However, if this is not possible, please contact the factory 888-925-5444 and ask for the After Sales/Service Department.

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What is a Purge cycle?

Each Vmax system is tested and checked at the factory prior to shipment to ensure trouble-free operation. In the unlikely event you encounter a problem, we recommend that you consult with your local distributor for parts/service. Remember, when calling for service, parts or system information, always have the pump or system model number and serial number ready.

Purge cycles are designed to purge process air from the vacuum system at shutdown to prevent non condensables from collecting in the vacuum pump. This is often used in laboratory applications. Systems designed with purge cycles include automatic purging of the pump prior to pump shutdown and lead/lag operation with pump alternation for multiplex systems. On/off setpoints and alternation is accomplished through the use of a PLC or logic controller.

Auto Purge operates in the following manner: Pumps start based on vacuum setpoint demands. When the pump starts, the inlet isolation valve solenoid (normally closed) opens and allows air to reach the actuator and open the inlet isolation valve. The purge solenoid valve (normally closed) remains closed.

Before the pump shuts down, it must operate through a 10-minute purge cycle. In the purge cycle, the pneumatic inlet isolation valve solenoid is closed, allowing the inlet isolation valve to be closed. The purge solenoid valve opens to allow atmospheric air into the system to remove condensable vapors.

If the pump is stopped in the normal mode, it will continue to run through the 10-minute purge cycle. FOR EMERGENCY SHUT DOWN USE THE ESTOP! Do not forget that the inlet isolation solenoid needs to be energized to open the valve when the system demand requires it.

If the system is placed in the purge mode, the system will run through the 10-minute purge cycle and shut down. This is a momentary contact closure. This process is only for DEKKER Vacuum systems that are equipped with the optional Auto-Purge function.

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I would like a DEKKER Service Technician on-site Startup Assistance.

Contact DEKKER After Sales Team to schedule your start-up. Please schedule two weeks in advance of start-up. A purchase order must be received per After Sales Estimate. Technician will observe and document start up and train operators. Technician will not be responsible for connecting the system to the process, electrical installation, or troubleshooting customer’s process. The system must be installed and ready to run upon technician’s arrival.

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Our Dekker controller keeps turning off the vacuum pump and the display is showing a static IP address even though we do not have the controller networked. What would cause this?

The IP address is displayed whenever the power is cycled, since you are seeing this message and the pump is turning off, the most likely cause would be intermittent power (either from the supply side, or from the 24vdc power supply inside the enclosure).

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We have three Vmax systems with Dekker controllers that are networked together. One of the controllers is only displaying a static IP address and cannot be powered up. I’m assuming the back-up battery has gone dead, how do I correct this issue?

The back-up battery in the Dekker controller only maintains the real-time clock and has no effect on the networking operation. The unit in question may not be properly configured/connected to the system network. Once networking is enabled on the Dekker controller, each subsequent power-up will require the controller to establish communications with other systems on the network. If during this power-up phase, communications cannot be established, the controller will default to stand-alone operation in about 2 minutes. Therefore, wait a couple minutes after power up to see if the unit can be accessed.  If it can, check the network configuration/connections, if it cannot, this controller may be defective and require replacement. 

For assistance, please contact the factory 888-925-5444 and ask for the After Sales/Service Department.

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I would like a DEKKER Service Technician on-site for Service/Maintenance.

DEKKER Service technicians can perform field service. Allow two weeks in advance notice. A purchase order must be received per After Sales Estimate. You will only be billed for actual hours worked and parts used.

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Applications

Do you have a crossover for “Insert Manufacturer Here” pump?

We carry many capacity equivalents and some direct bolt-in replacements for competitor’s pumps. Please visit the cross reference section on our website for more information. If your pump is not found here feel free to give us a call and we would be glad to help!

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How do I calculate my evacuation time?

Our Vacuum Fact Sheet has a section dedicated to the evacuation of a closed vessel. Please remember that pressures used must be in Absolute scale to work in this formula.

 

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How do I convert SCFM to ACFM?

Our Vacuum Fact Sheet has a section dedicated to the conversion of SCFM to ACFM. Please remember that pressures used must be in Absolute scale to work in this formula.

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How does seal water temperature effect the capacity of my liquid ring vacuum pump?

A general rule of thumb, warmer seal fluid will decrease capacity and the ultimate vacuum level achievable. Our website has a section dedicated to the seal water temperature effects on liquid ring vacuum pumps.

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What is the difference between a “M”, “K”, and “P” style liquid ring vacuum pump?

The “M” style liquid ring vacuum pump is a motor mounted vacuum pump. The vacuum pump is directly mounted on the motor, and the impeller is mounted on the motor shaft. This provides a cost effective solution and saves space.


The “K” style liquid ring vacuum pump is a Monoblock vacuum pump. The vacuum pump is mounted on a Monoblock assembly, which has a C-Face to accept a NEMA frame electric motor (Single stage up to 300 CFM). This provides a more robust solution as the pump and motor are connected with a flexible coupling.

The “P” style liquid ring vacuum pump is a pedestal vacuum pump. The vacuum pump is a bare shaft pump. This allows the customer to belt drive or direct drive this pump with any engine or motor technology.

All other single stage pumps (450 CFM and larger) are considered “K” style pumps, and are bare shaft pumps.
 

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What is the difference between Absolute and Gauge pressure?

See our article on "What Is Vacuum?"

 

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What is the difference between Standard Cubic Feet per minute (SCFM) and Actual Cubic feet per Minute (ACFM)?

See our article "Inlet Volume Calculations"

 

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What is Cavitation and how does it affect the performance of a liquid ring vacuum pump?

Cavitation can occur when trying to achieve a deep level of vacuum. The seal fluid (water) rapidly evaporates and creates small pockets of gas near the tips of the impeller blades. These pockets of gas collapse and can cause damage to the pump. Cavitation can usually be identified by a pinging or loud noise during operation. See our article below for more information.

EFFECT OF SERVICE WATER TEMPERATURE ON CAPACITY OF LIQUID RING VACUUM PUMPS

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How does the operating temperature of Sealing liquid influence the capacity and vacuum level attained by a liquid ring vacuum pump?

See our article below -

 

EFFECT OF SERVICE WATER TEMPERATURE ON CAPACITY OF LIQUID RING VACUUM PUMPS

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Does the vacuum pump performance change with altitude?

See our article below -

ALTITUDE EFFECT ON THE OPERATION OF LIQUID RING VACUUM PUMPS

 

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What are the suction pressure ranges of different vacuum pumps?

Please see the performance curves of each individual pump to find the ultimate vacuum achievable.

Products and Parts

 

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What are the different vacuum applications by industry?

Refer to the Industry Section located on the Dekker home page or view Vacuum Applications by Industry located in our Resource Library. 

 

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What should be considered when sizing a knockout tank?

Each DEKKER system is tested and checked at the factory prior to shipment to ensure trouble-free operation. In the unlikely event you encounter a problem, we recommend that you consult with your local distributor for parts/service. Remember, when calling for service, parts or system information, always have the pump or system model number and serial number ready.

Click here to find your local authorized distributor

When sizing a knockout tank to put between the process and the vacuum system, there are many factors to consider. Please have the following information when contacting your DEKKER application specialist.

  • How much fluid is anticipated to be coming over from he process to the knockout tank (measured in gallons/minute)?
  • What is the process fluid that may be pulled into the knockout tank?
  • What is the temperature of the process fluid that may be pulled into the knockout tank?
  • What is the normal vacuum level at which the system will be operating?
  • Does the end user want a manual drain valve or a transfer pump to drain the knockout tank?
  • If a manual drain is desired, does the end user want a level switch added to protect against process upset?
  • If a transfer pump is desired, does the end user want it to be manually turned on and have a level switch to protect against
  • If a transfer pump is required, what are the control voltage requirements for the transfer pump?
  • Is there an area classification?
  • Are there any size restrictions for the knockout tank (either height or width restrictions)?
  • Will the end user require a clean out to be installed in the knockout tank?

You can download the PDF here

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What is the volatization and the vacuum infusion process

If you have produced a part with vacuum infusion, at some point you’ve probably noticed what appear to be air bubbles in the finished composite. Most likely, what you’ve seen isn’t simply air from the surrounding atmosphere due to a leak in the bag: it's vaporized resin! Understanding the relationship between resin selection, ambient temperature and vacuum pressure is critical to producing a properly cured part via vacuum infusion.

Recently, Polynova Composites participated in the evaluation of two polyester infusion resins. The test plans called for the production and testing of prototypical solid laminate test coupons wherein the resin system was the only variant. While the resin chemistries were thought to be similar, remarkably one system volatilized to the point of boiling at 24” HgV, whereas the other did so at 27” HgV at room temperature. Because boiling the resin would result in an unacceptable void content in the final part and vacuum pressure plays a critical role in the infusion process, Polynova Composites launched an investigation to better understand the factors involved.

Our goal was to improve understanding of the boiling behavior in the context of known characteristics of the resin systems. Thermodynamically, the boiling point of a liquid can be thought of as the disruption of equilibrium between thermal saturation and corresponding pressure saturation, where an increase in thermal energy or a decrease in pressure results in a phase change to the vapor state.

Download and read the full article here

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Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA)

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) was passed by Congress and signed into law on December 19, 2007.

The law affects the energy efficiency mandates for electric motors. EISA builds upon the previous EPAct (Energy Policy Act of 1992) updating mandated efficiency standards for general purpose, three-phase AC industrial motors from 1 to 500 horsepower which are manufactured for sale in the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for establishing the rules to implement and enforce EPAct.

All standard EPAct efficiency motors (subtype 1) shall meet the minimum NEMA premium efficiency standards as defined in NEMA M-G1 (2006) Table 1212. This will apply to motors from 1 to 200 HP. In addition, the minimal efficiency for all motors will be changed to meet Tare 1 design.

All motors rated at 201 to 500 HP that are manufactured for use in the United States and its territories shall meet the EPAct (2007) efficiency levels as established by the USC policy. The nominal full load efficiency is defined in NEMA MG-1 (2006) Table 1211. Standard efficiency motors will no longer be acceptable.

Fire-pump motors shall meet the EPAct (2007) standards. The nominal full-load efficiency requirements are defined in NEMA MG-1 (2006) Table 1211.

The following motors which were previously excluded from energy legislation are now included in the Energy Policy and Conversation Act of 2007. These motors will now be required to meet the energy efficiency standards based on NEMA MG-1 (2006) Table 1211 as the minimum nominal efficiency.

  • All U-Frame Manufactured Motors
  • Quarry Duty or Design-C Torque Motors
  • Close-Coupled Pump Motors
  • All Footless Frame Motors
  • Vertical Solid Shaft Motors - Normal Thrust Design
  • All 8-Pole Motors (900 RPM)
  • Induction Motors with Voltages Other than 230/460 V, but Not Greater than 600 V [Policy Update April 2, 2009]

Many of the vacuum systems produced by DEKKER Vacuum Technologies use Baldor electric motors. Baldor has produced an FAQ document that answers many of the questions asked about how the new EISA standards impact the motors they produce. Please see the link below to read the entire document.

Baldor FAQ document

Remember, when calling for service, parts or system information, always have the pump or system model number and serial number ready.

 

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How can I determine my vacuum needs?

Determining your vacuum needs is the most important stage of any system decision-making process.  Incomplete or inaccurate information can lead to delays in the quoting process and can result in incorrect pump sizing, either of which is detrimental to the application’s success.  In order to determine if you have all of the required information needed to find the best vacuum solution possible, please provide a specification and answer the following questions.

Vacuum Needs Analysis - Baseline Questions:

  1. What is the application?
    a.)  Is it a wet or a dry application?
  • For wet applications, usually a liquid ring pump system is the correct choice for this application
  • For dry applications, most types of vacuum pumps can be used

      b.)  Is it a dirty or clean application?

  • This usually determines that either a liquid ring pump system be used and/or an inlet filter is required.
     
  1. Are there any vapors being pulled into the pump?
  • This is important, because vapors may be corrosive and could condense in the pump affecting the seal liquid’s vapor pressure, performance and material compatibility.  The amount of vapor (or concentration) is also important in order to determine how significant the affect will be on the vacuum pump.
     
  1. Is the pump a replacement?
    -  Obtain as much information as possible about the existing pump.  (i.e. model, HP, serial #, manufacturer, etc.)
     
  2. What is the required capacity? 
  • Is the information given to you in ACFM or SCFM?  If there is confusion, it’s a good idea to determine the motor size on the existing pump.
  • What is the operating vacuum level?  If you are unsure, see if you can have a Dekker Vacuum Expert help to determine this or take a look at the pump in operation.  
  • What is the maximum vacuum required?  Be careful with this number versus the operating vacuum level.  Many times customers indicate that they need as much vacuum as they can get or may state that they desire a maximum of 29”Hg.  However, the customers may not realize that there is a dramatic difference in the size (and price) of a vacuum system specified at 25”Hg versus 29”Hg.  The characteristics of vacuum pumps are such that their performance curves drop off in the higher vacuum range and air leakage expands at high vacuum 5 times more at 29” Hg as compared with 25” Hg. 
     
  1. Have you been pleased with the performance of your current pump?
  • You may not be using the best pump for this application.  Specifically list what problems you have been experiencing.
  • What about maintenance?  Do the existing pumps require a great deal of maintenance?  Different pumps require different levels of maintenance.  Choose the pump type that is best suited for your organization.
  • Are you pleased with the performance of your current supplier?  If not, why not?
  1. Determine the general operating conditions of the application
  • What are the minimum and maximum ambient temperatures, vacuum pump inlet temperature, altitude, electrical utilities and water availability (flowrate and temperature).
  • Determine the electrical utilities on the site as well as the motor enclosure and control panel enclosure required.
     
  1. Do you just want to replace the existing unit, or would you like to oversize for future expansion?  Are you interested in a exploring the benefits of a central system?
     
  2. How quickly do you need a vacuum solution?  By indicating priority level when requesting a quotation helps potential suppliers to provide quotations quickly and efficiently. 
     
  3. How quickly do you need the equipment?  Have funds been budgeted for the purchase of the equipment?  Would you prefer a rental or a lease?
     

10.) Who else have you considered to help you with this purchase?  This will allow a vacuum expert to inform you of the best options available in the market.

 

Requesting a Quotation:

When you have collected the above information send it to Dekkers’ Vacuum Experts. The Sales engineers at Dekker will provide you with the pump best suited for the application.  Be sure to state when you need the by to help us prioritize requests.

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What is the recommended way to install the discharge piping on a Vmax system?

Please refer to page 12 of the Vmax IOM Manual

We do not recommend installation parameters beyond that of the IOM without seeing the installation. Please contact your local distributor for further assistance.

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I have an older condenser exhauster that consists of a single stage liquid ring vacuum pump and an atmospheric air ejector. It seems to have really fallen off in capacity. What’s the problem?

These types of exhausters were popular prior to the mid-1970’s but, unfortunately, did not equal their published capacities.  They did, however, perform adequately when the condenser leaks were eliminated enough to be less than the ‘true’ capacity of the exhausters.  Their reduced capacities became very apparent when they were ‘partnered’ with properly rated exhausters such as two-stage liquid rings, reciprocating units, etc.   It is reasonable when the exhauster changes to the ‘holding’ mode and the atmospheric [motive] air is allowed to enter through the jet nozzle, the net vacuum pump capacity drops significantly because it must now handle the motive air as well as the air/ water vapor mixture being pulled from the condenser.  There is some adiabatic cooling that reduces some of the water vapor load, but it is not enough to make up the difference. 

In addition to this type of exhauster being undersized, as the power plant has aged, more leaks have appeared [it happens to the best of us] and one of the primary source of leaks is within the exhauster itself. 

  • Check out the shaft seals [most of these units have packing that is famous for leaking inward].
  • Check out the two control valves associated with the air ejector ---- one for the air ejector bypass and one for the motive air.  At roughly 5”HgA, the bypass valve closes and the motive air valve opens.  Improper seating of these two valves can cause a large loss in performance.  Unfortunately, many of these valves were custom-made and parts may no longer be available.

Air-Jet_Exhauster_Diagram

 

More than likely, your older model exhauster, even at its reduced capacity, has given you many years of good 24/7 service.  Maybe it’s time to consider upgrading to a two-stage liquid ring exhauster with mechanical shaft seals as well as anti-cavitation features to include a stainless steel rotor.   

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I have a pair of steam ejectors that are currently holding the vacuum on the main condenser and I want to replace those with mechanical vacuum pumps. How do I determine what size pumps to use?

You can check the original data sheets from the ejector manufacturer, if available and check the sizing data, such as dry air load. Or otherwise you need to obtain a copy of a document published by the Heat Exchange Institute [HEI] entitled “Standards for Steam Surface Condensers.” See table attached.  You will need the following data:

  • Number of Condenser Shells (enclosures) – usually one, but sometimes two or three.
  • Number of main openings --- these are the exhausts from the main turbines that drive the generators --- typically one but maybe more.
  • Number of total openings --- includes the main openings as well as auxiliary openings, such as those from turbines driving the boiler feed pumps.
  • Total steam load to the condenser ---- expressed in lbs/hr.

Procedure:

  • Find the table for the appropriate number of condenser shells.
  • Divide the total steam load by the number of main exhaust openings and use this number to find the appropriate effective steam flow in the left column of the table.
  • Look in this row to find the column corresponding to the number of exhaust openings.
  • The top number in the appropriate box will be the SCFM requirement, which is the dry air component to which we have to add the amount of water vapor it takes to saturate the mixture. It is important to know that although the number is in SCFM, the condenser exhauster should be able handle this amount of air leakage at an inlet pressure of 1” HgA.

The following example assumes a single shell condenser with two main openings, two auxiliary openings and a total steam load of 1,200,000 lbs/hr. We check the HEI table “A” for One Condenser Shell and divide the total steam load by the number of openings, which gives us a an effective steam load for each opening of 300,000 lbs/hr. Refer to the left column and pick the row applicable for 250,000 – 500,000. Go to the right and pick the column for 4 openings and we find a SCFM requirement of 20. This is the number required by the vacuum pump manufacturer to do the sizing.

Two stage liquid ring vacuum pumps are generally considered to be the most cost efficient for this application but in addition to the SCFM requirement it is very important to know the cooling water requirement at the operating point --- the colder the water, the better the performance. In fact it is best to have the same water temperature supplied to the heat exchanger of the vacuum pump as the cooling water temperature supplied to the condenser.  The cooling water temperature supplied to the condenser will dictate the condenser pressure that can be achieved and somewhere in the original condenser design data you will find the design condition based on the cooling water temperature,  for example: 1.5” HgA with 67deg. F cooling water.

Once all the data is available the next decision is how many vacuum pumps are required to cover the total HEI requirement, i.e. one 100% unit or two 50% units but often two 100% units are installed.

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Can your rotary vane pumps be used with a VFD (Variable Frequency Drive)?

The rotary vane pumps can only operate on 50Hz or 60Hz and cannot be used with a VFD.

For assistance, please contact the factory 888-925-5444.

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Can you provide more details on your Dekker Controller?

The DEKKER Controller IOM manual should be able to assist better.

 

For assistance, please contact the factory 888-925-5444.

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Why is saturated air vacuum pump capacity is more than dry air?

At certain conditions, a liquid ring pump can act as a condenser as well as a vacuum pump, increasing its capacity. See our related articles below -

CONVERSION FACTORS — SATURATED/DRY AIR FOR LIQUID RING VACUUM PUMPS

EFFECT OF SATURATED AIR SERVICE ON THE CAPACITY OF LIQUID RING VACUUM PUMPS

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Sales

Are vacuum pumps or systems available for rent or lease?

Dekker Vacuum Technologies offers rental and leasing programs upon request. Our rental fleet includes Vmax systems in a wide range of capacities.


Please contact our Sales Team at 1-888-925-5444 for more information.

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Is there a distributor in this area?

Dekker Vacuum Technologies has an extensive network of distributors. Please contact us at 1-888-925-5444 for more information.

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Do you have a distributor in the area for service?

Dekker Vacuum Technologies has an extensive network of Distributors and Service Centers. Please contact us at 1-888-925-5444 for more information.

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